we’re still at the bleeding edge of this technology

Don’t be upsetti, print some spaghetti

It’s…. pretty well acceptable that the sock falling off was the cause of this silliness. It’s so ridiculous I can’t even be mad.

Have a good laugh at this stupid thing.

And I never could even figure out where that leakage came from

Behold, my poor hacked on Ender-3. I had bought a clone of the Micro Swiss hotend (I believe off Amazon) so I could print PETG and other high temp materials without PFTE tubing damage issues. I’d also had issues back then with getting the PTFE tubing to seal against the nozzle so I figured this setup would be great!

Unfortunately, I bought… the lowest caliber of dumpshit.

In what I thought was just desperately throwing parts at my printing issues, which led to “missing layer” kind of faults everywhere, I bought this titanium heat break from TH3D. It works with all the other stock hotend parts, which I’d saved in a box of bits. Turns out that’s exactly what I needed… So here’s what I replaced.

Strange, unlike the stock setup, that heat break doesn’t go in there very far…
’bout five millimeters
Uh. That looks awfully rough. In fact… I ran filament down by hand and could feel it snagging.
This is how far it actually goes together

I’m not actually sure what kind of metal this was made of to be honest or if it was even advertised as titanium, stainless, —???

All I can say though is I suspect it’s way too thermally conductive. I had to print hotter than I expected on this machine and the PID tuning values were WILDLY different after changing the heat break. Previously, with the same filament, this temp tower was just starting to print acceptably at the lowest floor which is 230C; now the lower floor is string city, which makes a lot more sense for PLA. Oh, and no missed layers either.

Before I start yelling about 3d printers and capacitors

Previously…

See how I had that big area of my natural color showing in back? That was a heck of a missed opportunity, and the green just wasn’t liking the base color.

Fixed that right up.

Related image:

But who wore it better?

May I just take a microsecond here

Hey, it’s me, I want to give you some good frequencies. (The part I’m referring to is the very end, and the bandpass filtered beat you hear in the background is the beat to Eple, which follows it on the album. Eple will sound familiar to anyone who’s ever fired up a fresh install of Mac OS 10.3…)

But all that aside, this is about metrology and frequency standards and things my cat likes to loaf herself on top of because they’re warm.

We’re preparing for the installation of a new GatesAir Maxiva DTV transmitter at work. I was gonna say it’s an ATSC transmitter, but… I’d at least like to hope… it’s ATSC3 ready, whenever that rolls out. Sitting in the space it was going to reside in was a weird old Axcera transmitter that never worked right and was yanked out in pieces to be e-waste’d. Sitting on one of the pallets of refuse left over was the reference oscillator for the exciter, which, interestingly, was just a standalone thing without GPS synchronization. The tub in the middle is an insulated chamber containing an oven controlled crystal oscillator. Basically, this is an oscillator in a thermostatically controlled heated chamber that keeps it stable. It MUST be allowed to warm up to full operating temperature before use, or, well… it just ain’t gonna be in spec!

(insert commentary here on how silly it is that I’ve seen OCXOs in battery powered equipment that has a shorter battery life than the warmup time)

Most modern stuff uses GPS sync because it’s a good inexpensive way of obtaining a stable reference frequency and timecode. The usual arrangement is to have a voltage controlled oscillator that’s PLL locked to a 10khz timing signal output from a GPS receiver head. Aside from a little bit of phase noise possible in the system, it’s always spot on. This is why you’ll see funky little cone shaped GPS receiver antennas all over the place at broadcast facilities.

Here’s the Evertz system we have that takes GPS time and frequency references and generates our facility master clocks, black burst, and trilevel video sync. I’ve never really gotten that good a look at the way it operates but I think the black burst is generated inside the automatic changeover unit which also has some distribution amplifiers in the back as well. One of the outputs is a 10.000.00000 (I’m not sure how many significant figures) reference which can be used by a wide range of equipment. After having an, uh, experience, with one of these changeover units (see link above) I wisely do not even look at it hard while we’re in anything but 4:00 AM Sunday morning backwash programming. A frame of Grass Valley distribution amplifiers near it is used to distribute its black burst, LTC timecode, and 10mhz signals to where they’re needed throughout the facility.

This will come into play later.

The toroidal power transformer has two primary windings which were series wired for operation on 240vac. That’s why it says 240 on the AC terminal block shield. I swapped them to paralleled for 120.

More pictures and calibration process — onward

Read more “May I just take a microsecond here”