Hexem E-I-R Meter: Angry Battery Salad

I was at Surplus Stuff and they had two of these Hexem E-I-R meters. They’re beautiful multimeters that were introduced by Belleville-Hexem of Los Gatos, California around 1958.

Los Gatos? That’s me! Prrrrrp!

Google it if you wish but you’ll only find tiny blurbs where it was advertised in a few trade magazines from 1958-1960, and it was recommended by Systron-Donner to calibrate an early chopper stabilized instrumentation amplifier.

Hexem also advertised an “incremental” meter that sounds in concept like a differential voltmeter. This one’s interesting in that it can measure some very high resistances.


And now, we take out two screws in the back and go to look for what batteries it needs. I’m guessing maybe a D and a B (45 volt). Okay, the beautifully built steel case comes apart aaaaaaand

What have I done?!

I’m questioning some of my choices in life about now

There are more battery holders hidden under the shield here?!

Ok, so breaking it down… The RM1R is a 1.34 or 1.5v cell, kinda a 1/3 AA or so. I say 1.34 or 1.5 because I’m unsure if it was supposed to be mercury or alkaline.

Mercury batteries were common in measurement applications through the 1960s as they provided good life and very stable voltage over their lifespan. Of course, they create an toxic ecological disaster and have fallen from use. They’re common in early camera light meters, in which case they can be directly substituted for a zinc-air hearing aid battery with no recalibration required (the change in reading is less than 1/3 f/ stop, which is less than the adjustment steps on any film camera I’ve ever seen!)

The two batteries down in the weird saddle holder would have definitely been LARGE 1.34v mercury cells.

Meanwhile the two common ones are the D cell and the 9v at upper right. Yes I checked the cross reference. The tall cylindrical cells are 6v and N are small alkalines.

This is ridiculous and beautiful and I’m not sure if I’m going to bother acquiring several pounds of uncommon batteries to use it. Uhhhhhhh

Caution: cuteness ahead!

I came home and found this happy crescent roll on my pillow

She started to stick out a paw and I put my hand near it and she put her little peet on my hand and pulled it closer

Then I found myself confused as suddenly there was a big shrimp on the pillow

Eventually we were treated to some major sleepy happy kitty action

And once again I foolishly placed my hand under her little chin aaaaaand zonk I’m a kitty pillow

Little box of happiness

Lately, Cassie has liked to hide in this box and play with the ribbon as we swing it in front.

What a little cutie patootey!

I was gonna say something here about old Telos phone hybrids but……. Meow! Thanks for taking my mind off those, Cassie.

Excuse me, Cassie, you are being too dang cute.

After an experience that wanted to make me go SHITPOST ANGRILY I overslept this morning and woke up to the sight of a happy tortie peacefully sunning herself and I couldn’t even be mad anymore over the previous evening’s events that had me stuck up a mountain for hours while a technician for Derp Valley Wireless was ordered to try re-aiming an Ubiquiti radio over and over again because the team down in the office was seeing an RSSI value 2 dB shy of what their link calculations said it should be. Four hours for 2 dB. But look at this tortie. SQUEEEEEEEEEEE

Catposting loudly

Please note, and be entirely unsurprised by, the fact that the yellow and red thing at right is an enormous Pikachu

sneaky girl who cannot be found

Six months ago, we adopted Cassie and those have been six incredibly happy months filled with lots of purrs, kitty cuddles, and general cuteness.

Oh, and tortie toes.

Tortie.stl

When configuring Klipper to run your delta printer, always set the option silly_cat: true in the config file.

Here, daddy, let me confirm those delta arm and tower measurements for you! That’s one fang, two fangs…..

She likes the feel of the cog belt against her face.

Object has exceeded build area! Harmlessly. Huh.

In keeping with my brother’s Pusheen-based naming convention for the prototyping lab apparatus at the lab he works in at FIU…. this printer is Deltasheen.

For another example of that, here’s a

SheenTel. My idea is actually to have a row of these Pusheens at our studios that light up in a soft green or blue during normal operation, but if one of the Nautel transmitters sends an SNMP alert, the station’s corresponding Pusheen will blink amber or red.